Is Long Term Care Insurance Really a Good Idea?

Clients are often concerned that long term care insurance is too costly, but it may not be compared to the cost of private paying long term care.

Forbes’ recent article entitled “Is Long-Term Care Insurance Right For You?” says that a big drawback for many is the fact that long term care insurance (“LTCI”) is expensive. However, think about the costs of long term care. For example, the current median annual cost for assisted living is $43,539, and for a private room in a nursing home, it’s more than $92,000.  In many urban areas it is much higher, so utilizing long term care insurance my be best.

Another issue is that there’s no way to accurately determine if in fact you’ll even need long term care. Much of it depends on your own health and family history. However, planning for the possibility is key and unfortunately most clients don’t plan for long term care either with insurance, retirement or in their estate plans.

Remember that Medicare and other types of health insurance don’t cover most of the cost of long term care—what are known as “activities of daily living,” like bathing, dressing, eating, using the bathroom and moving. Medicare will only pay for medically necessary skilled nursing and home care, such as giving shots and changing dressings and not assisted-living costs, like bathing and eating. Supplemental insurance policies generally don’t pay for this type of care.  Those who meet financial guidelines may receive care provided under Medicaid or other benefits such as Veterans benefits.

It is important to shop around as there are no one-size-fits-all long term care insurance policies. Check the policy terms and be sure you understand:

  • The things that are covered, such as skilled nursing, custodial care, assisted living and in home care
  • If Alzheimer’s disease is covered as it’s a leading reason for needing long-term care
  • If there are any limitations on pre-existing conditions
  • The maximum payouts, including if maximum payouts are by day or year
  • If the payments are adjusted for inflation, which depending on the time of purchase might be key
  • The lag time until benefits begin
  • How long benefits will last, including whether there are lifetime caps on the amount paid or time periods paid
  • If there’s a waiver of premium benefit, which suspends premiums when you are collecting long-term care benefits
  • If there’s a non-forfeiture benefit, which offers limited coverage even if you cancel the policy
  • If the current premiums are guaranteed in future years, or if there are limits on future increases
  • How many times rates have increased in the past 10 years
  • If you purchase a group policy through an employer, see if it is portable (if you can take it with you if you change jobs).

Typically, when you are between 55 to 60 is the most cost-effective time to buy LTCI, if you’re in good health. See my prior blog on this point.  https://www.galliganmanning.com/when-should-i-consider-long-term-care-insurance/   The younger you buy, the lower the cost. However, you will be paying premiums longer. Premiums usually increase as you get older and less healthy. There’s a possibility that you’ll be denied coverage, if your health becomes poor. Therefore, while it’s not inexpensive, buying LTCI sooner rather than later may be the best move.

The best thing to do is to consult your financial advisor and your insurance agent on whether a LTCI policy, and which, will work best for you.

Reference: Forbes (April 17, 2020) “Is Long-Term Care Insurance Right For You?”

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Would an Early Retirement and Early Social Security Be Smart?

Older employees who have been laid off need to consider the long-term repercussions of taking Social Security early.
Older employees who have been laid off need to consider the long-term repercussions of taking Social Security early.

For older employees who are laid off as a result of the pandemic, the idea of an early retirement and taking Social Security benefits early may seem like the best or only way forward. However, cautions Forbes in the article “Should You Take Social Security Earlier Than Planned If You’re Laid Off Due to COVID-19?,” this could be a big mistake with long-term repercussions.

In the recession that began in 2008, there were very few jobs for older workers. As a result, many had no choice but to take Social Security early. The problem is that taking benefits early means a smaller benefit.

In 2009, one year after the market took a nosedive, as many as 42.4 percent of 62-year-olds signed up for Social Security benefits. By comparison, in 2008, the number of 62-year-olds who took Social Security benefits was 37.6 percent.

You can start taking Social Security early and then stop it later. However, there are other options for those who are strapped for cash.

There is a new tool from the IRS that allows taxpayers to update their direct deposit information to get their stimulus payment faster and track when to expect it. There is also a separate tool for non-tax filers.

Apply for unemployment insurance. Yes, the online system is coping with huge demand, so it is going to take more than a little effort and patience. However, unemployment insurance is there for this very same purpose. Part of the economic stimulus package extends benefits to gig workers, freelancers and the self-employed, who are not usually eligible for unemployment.

Consider asking a family member for a loan, or a gift. Any individual is allowed to give someone else up to $15,000 a year with no tax consequences. Gifts that are larger require a gift tax return, but no tax is due. The amount is simply counted against the amount that any one person can give tax free during their lifetime. That amount is now over $11 million. By law, you can accept a loan from a family member up to $10,000 with no paperwork. After that amount, you’ll need a written loan agreement that states that interest will be charged – at least the minimum AFR—Applicable Federal Rate. An estate planning attorney can help you with this.

Tap retirement accounts—gently. The stimulus package eases the rules around retirement account loans and withdrawals for people who have been impacted by the COVID-19 downturn. The 10% penalty for early withdrawals before age 59½ has been waived for 2020.

If you must take Social Security, you can do so starting at age 62. In normal times, the advice is to tap retirement accounts before taking Social Security, so that your benefits can continue to grow. The return on Social Security continues to be higher than equities, so this is still good advice.

For more information on how the coronavirus has affected retirement planning see https://www.galliganmanning.com/massive-changes-to-rmds-from-stimulus-package/

Reference: Forbes (April 15, 2020) “Should You Take Social Security Earlier Than Planned If You’re Laid Off Due to COVID-19?”

 

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Helping Seniors Battle the Unspoken COVID-19 Toll: Loneliness

Isolation leads to loneliness in seniors.

Social distancing is a new term we have all become familiar with over the past several weeks. An essential step in reducing transmission of the coronavirus, it’s important to note that distancing also can cause social isolation and loneliness. Although this can affect anyone, regardless of age, the elderly are particularly vulnerable at this time.

What exactly is loneliness? We have all experienced loneliness at some time, but a more refined understanding can help us help our loved ones.  While social isolation is simply not being around other people, loneliness is a subjective feeling – a sense of suffering from being disconnected from other people. In other words, social isolation may lead to feelings of loneliness. Studies have linked these persistent feelings to higher risks of conditions like heart disease, high blood pressure, anxiety, depression and even death.

How to Help

Experts offer guidance on how we can help our elderly loved ones combat feelings of loneliness and avoid their negative mental and physical health consequences.

Some tips:

  • Help with the technology for video chats and social media.
  • Set up regular phone calls or video chats on a daily or weekly routine.
  • Explore online learning opportunities, especially those designed especially for seniors.
  • Help your elderly loved ones to change their expectations for the time being, and understand that this situation is temporary.

Resources: ABC News, The unspoken COVID-19 toll on the elderly: Loneliness, April 14, 2020.

 

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