An Often Misdiagnosed Dementia

Lewey body dementia is an often misdiagnosed dementia.
Lewey body dementia is an often misdiagnosed dementia.

Many people had never heard of Lewy body dementia until it was reported in 2014 that this was the disease that afflicted Robin Williams. While Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are the two most common types of dementia, those who have Lewy body dementia are often misdiagnosed as having Alzheimer’s disease or depression. As a result, they do not get the treatment and support they need.

Considerable’s recent article entitled “The second most common type of dementia often goes unrecognized” reports that in one study, nearly 70% of people diagnosed with Lewy body dementia visited three consultants before receiving the diagnosis. For 33% of people with the disease, the dementia was misdiagnosed and getting the correct diagnosis took over two years.

There are two different conditions associated with Lewy body dementia: dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia. In dementia with Lewy bodies, problems with memory and thinking occur simultaneously with problems involving movement, like those associated with Parkinson’s disease. In Parkinson’s disease dementia, a person who has had movement problems resembling Parkinson’s disease for several years, then develops difficulties with memory and thinking.

In addition to memory, thinking, and movement problems, symptoms of Lewy body dementia include issues with alertness and concentration, hallucinations and paranoia, acting out dreams during sleep, low blood pressure when standing, daytime sleepiness and depression.

Because the symptoms of Lewy body dementia often resemble other conditions, research reveals that the first diagnosis is commonly incorrect. For example, in one study 26% of people who had Lewy body dementia were misdiagnosed as having Alzheimer’s disease, and 24% were determined to have a psychiatric diagnosis like depression.

We saw this first hand at our firm when a family member was suffering with this kind of dementia. It went undiagnosed until it was too late to treat it properly. We feel it’s important to get the word out to family members who might think their loved one is suffering from depression, Parkinson’s disease, or another kind of dementia.

Failure to properly diagnose a person with Lewy body dementia can result in delay in treatment specifically targeted for that condition. Also, with the correct diagnosis, patients and families can seek out resources, such as the Lewy Body Dementia Association, an organization dedicated to helping people living with this disease. This group provides education on Lewy body dementia, helps patients and families know what to expect, connects patients and families to support and resources and helps them find research opportunities.

For more information on dementia issues see https://www.galliganmanning.com/some-common-drugs-may-increase-risk-of-dementia/

Reference: Considerable (Aug. 14, 2020) “The second most common type of dementia often goes unrecognized”

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Some Common Drugs May Increase Risk of Dementia

Some common drugs may cause increased risk of dementia.
Some common drugs may cause increased risk of dementia.

Research conducted in 2019 has strengthened the connection between the risk of dementia and a common class of drugs used to treat a variety of symptoms.

Anticholinergics are a type of medication that blocks the action of acetylcholine. That’s a chemical messenger (or “neurotransmitter”) in the brain that help coordinate breathing, digestion, urination and other functions.

Anticholinergics can treat a variety of ailments, including urinary incontinence.

Considerable’s recent article entitled “These common prescription drugs could boost your risk of dementia” reports that anticholinergics include a roster of drugs for depression (such as Paxil), psychosis (such as Thorazine), Parkinson’s disease (such as Cogentin) and bladder disorders (such as Ditropan).

The 2019 study found a nearly 50% increase in chances of dementia in those people who received more than 1,095 daily doses of these drugs in a 10-year period.

The research was published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The study, sponsored by the University of Nottingham, monitored 284,343 patients age 55 and older between 2004 and 2016. The researchers examined the total standardized daily doses (TSDDs) of anticholinergic drugs during that time period.

The researchers said that this was the equivalent to a senior taking a strong anticholinergic medication daily for at least three years.

Researchers looked at each person’s anticholinergic exposure and found the most frequently prescribed anticholinergic drugs were antidepressants, drugs to treat vertigo, motion sickness or vomiting and an overactive bladder.

The researchers at the University of Nottingham discovered that some other anticholinergic antihistamines and gastrointestinal drugs failed to correspond to a higher incidence of dementia.

The UK study shows a correlation between these specific anticholinergic drugs and increased chances of dementia. However, the researchers cautioned that seniors shouldn’t stop taking any medications without talking with their doctor.

Reference: Considerable (July 1, 2020) “These common prescription drugs could boost your risk of dementia”

 

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Your Children Want You to Have an Estate Plan

Clients often forget that a solid estate plan makes things much easier for their kids. Even the kids want you to have an estate plan!

Many clients delay creating an estate plan.  People don’t want to think about scenarios where they are deceased or incapacitated, and some people delay because they are afraid of costs.  Clients often think of the impact of estate planning on themselves, forgetting that their children want them to have an estate plan too.

After all, it is the adult children who are in charge of aging parents when they need long term care. They are also the ones who settle estates when parents die. Even if they can’t always come out and tell you, the recent article, “Why your children wish you had an Elder Law Estate Plan” from the Times Herald-Record spells out exactly why an elder law estate plan is so important for your loved ones.

Avoid court proceedings while living. In a perfect world, everyone over age 18 will have a financial power of attorney, a medical power of attorney and a living will, as well as other estate planning documents to facilitate their use.  These documents appoint others to make financial, legal, and medical decisions, in case of incapacity. Without them, the children will have to get involved with time-consuming, expensive guardianship proceedings, where a judge appoints a legal guardian to make these decisions. Your life is turned over to a court-appointed guardian, instead of your children or another person of your choosing.  This is an expensive and invasive process.

Avoid court proceedings after you die. If you die and you own assets in your own name that do not pass by contract, you will likely go through the probate process, a court proceeding that can be time consuming and costly. Not having any assets in trusts leaves your kids open to out of pocket costs, time, work and difficulty in gathering assets.

Wills in probate court are public documents. Trusts are private documents. Utilizing trusts can keep the details of your estate out of the public eye.

An elder law estate plan also plans for the possibility of long term care and costs. Nursing home care costs can be extreme, and many clients don’t plan for such a creditor during their life time. If you don’t have long term care insurance, you should consider an estate plan that facilitates long term care government benefits, such as a revocable trust plan.

The “elder law power of attorney” has unlimited gifting powers that could save about half of a single person’s assets from the cost of nursing homes. This can be done on the eve of needing nursing home care, but it is always better to do this planning in advance.  This is one of the main roadblocks to Medicaid planning later in life.  Client’s don’t update their powers of attorney and limited their gifting options.

Having a plan in place decreases stress and anxiety for adult children. They are likely busy with their own lives, working, caring for their children and coping in a challenging world. When a plan is in place, they don’t have to start learning about Medicaid law, navigating their way through the court system, or wondering why their parents did not take advantage of the time they had to plan properly.

You probably don’t want your children remembering you as the parents who left a financial and legal mess behind for the them to clean up. Speak with an elder law estate planning attorney to create a plan for your future. Your children will appreciate it.

And kids, see here for speaking with your parents about estate planning.  https://www.galliganmanning.com/probate-lawyers-say-talk-to-your-parents-about-estate-planning/

Reference: Times Herald-Record (May 23, 2020) “Why your children wish you had an Elder Law Estate Plan”

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