Three Retirement Myths to Avoid

 There are three common retirement myths relating to retirement age, medical coverage and social security that clients often suffer from.

While you’re busy planning to retire, chances are good you’ll run into more than a few retirement myths, things that people who otherwise seem sincere and sensible are certain of. However, don’t get waylaid because any one of these retirement myths could do real harm to your plans for an enjoyable retirement. That’s the lesson from a recent article titled “Let’s Leave These 3 Retirement Myths in 2020’s Dust” from Auburn.pub.

You can keep working as long as you want. It’s easy to say this when you are healthy and have a secure job but counting on a delayed retirement strategy leaves you open to many pitfalls, especially with the effect COVID-19 has had on the workplace. Nearly 40% of current retirees report having retired earlier than planned, according to a study from the Aegon Center for Longevity and Retirement. Job losses and health issues are the reasons most people gave for their change of plans. A mere 15% of those surveyed who left the workplace before they had planned on retiring, said they did so because their finances made it possible.

Decades before you plan to retire, you should have a clear understanding of how much of a nest egg you need to retire, while living comfortably during your senior years—which may last for one, two, three or even four decades. If your current plan is far from hitting that target, don’t expect working longer to make up for the shortfall. You might have no control over when you retire, so saving as much as you can right now to prepare is the best defense.

Medicare will cover all of your medical care. A common retirement myth is that Medicare will cover all of your medical costs and consequently retirees under plan for their needs.  Medicare will cover some of costs, but it doesn’t pay for everything. Original Medicare (Parts A and B) covers hospital visits and outpatient care but doesn’t cover vision and dental care. It also doesn’t cover prescription drug costs. Most people do not budget enough in their retirement income plans to cover the costs of medical care, from wellness visits to long term care.   Clients often insist they can afford or don’t believe they will need long term care expenses,  but often are mistaken.  You can see this article for a flavor of those issues.  https://www.galliganmanning.com/can-i-afford-in-home-elderly-care/   Medicare Advantage plans can provide more extensive coverage, but they often come with higher premiums. The average out-of-pocket healthcare cost for most people is $300,000 throughout retirement.

Social Security may disappear.  A final retirement myth is that social security will cover or mostly cover a retirees needs.  Nearly 90% of Americans depend upon Social Security to fund at least a part of their retirement, according to a Gallup poll, making this federal program a lifeline for Americans. Social Security does have some financial challenges. Since the early 1980s, the program took in more money in payroll taxes than it paid out in benefits, and the surplus went into a trust fund. However, the enormous number of Baby Boomers retiring made 2020, saw the first year the program paid out more money than it took in.

To compensate, it has had to make up the difference with withdrawals from the trust funds. As the number of retirees continues to rise, the surplus may be depleted by 2034. At that point, the Social Security Administration will rely on payroll taxes for retiree benefits. Assuming Congress doesn’t find a solution before 2034, benefits may be reduced or severely impacted.

Saving for retirement is challenging but focusing on the facts will help you remain focused on retirement goals, and not ghost stories. Your retirement planning should also include preparing and maintaining your estate plan.  This is an excellent time to sit with your financial advisor to determine whether your retirement planning is safe from these three myths.

Reference: Auburn.pub (Dec. 13, 2020) “Let’s Leave These 3 Retirement Myths in 2020’s Dust”

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When to Sign Up for Medicare

It's important to know the deadlines for when to sign up for Medicare.
It’s important to know the deadlines for when to sign up for Medicare.

It’s important to know the deadlines for when to sign up for Medicare and the penalties that can be imposed for late enrollment.

Here are the important dates for Medicare enrollment:

  • You can initially enroll in Medicare during the seven-month period that begins three months before you turn 65.
  • If you continue to work past 65, sign up for Medicare within eight months of leaving the job or group health plan or penalties apply.
  • The six-month Medicare Supplement Insurance enrollment period starts when you’re 65 or older and enrolled in Medicare Part B.
  • You can make changes to your Medicare coverage during the annual open enrollment period, from Oct. 15 to Dec. 7.
  • Medicare Advantage Plan participants can move to another plan from January 1 to March 31 each year.

Medicare Parts A and B Deadline. Individuals who are getting Social Security benefits, may be automatically enrolled in Parts A and B, and coverage starts the month they turn 65. However, those who haven’t claimed Social Security must proactively enroll in Medicare. You can first sign up for Medicare Part A hospital insurance and Medicare Part B medical insurance during the seven months that starts three months before the month you turn 65. Your coverage can start as soon as the first day of the month you turn 65, or the first day of the prior month, if your birthday falls on the first of the month. If you fail to enroll in Medicare during the initial enrollment period, you can sign up during the general enrollment period between January 1 and March 31 each year for coverage that will begin July 1. Note that you might be charged a late enrollment penalty when your benefit begins. Monthly Part B premiums increase by 10% for each 12-month period you delay signing up for Medicare, after becoming eligible for benefits.

If you or your spouse are still working after age 65 for an employer that provides group health insurance, you must enroll in Medicare within eight months of leaving the job or the coverage ending to avoid the penalty.

Medicare Part D Deadline. Part D prescription drug coverage has the same initial enrollment period of the seven months around your 65th birthday as Medicare Parts A and B, but the penalty is different. It’s calculated by multiplying 1% of the “national base beneficiary premium” ($32.74 in 2020) by the number of months you didn’t have prescription drug coverage after Medicare eligibility and rounding to the nearest 10 cents. That’s added to the Medicare Part D plan that you choose each year. As the national base beneficiary premium increases, your penalty also goes up.

Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan Deadline. These plans can be used to pay for some of Medicare’s cost-sharing requirements and some services that traditional Medicare doesn’t cover. The enrollment period is different than the other parts of Medicare. It is a six-month period that starts when you’re 65 or older and enrolled in Medicare Part B. During this open enrollment period, private health insurance companies must sell you a Medicare Supplement Insurance plan, regardless of your health conditions. After this enrollment period, insurance companies can use medical underwriting to decide how much to charge for the policy and can even reject you. If you miss the open enrollment period, you’re no longer guaranteed the ability to buy a Medicare Supplement Insurance plan without underwriting, or you could be charged significantly more, if you have any health conditions.

Medicare Open Enrollment Deadline. You can make changes to your Medicare coverage during the annual open enrollment period from October 15 to December 7. During this period, you can move to a new Medicare Part D prescription drug plan, join a Medicare Advantage Plan, or stop a Medicare Advantage Plan and return to original Medicare. Changes take effect on January 1 of the following year.

Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Deadline. Participants can move to another plan or drop their Medicare Advantage Plan and return to original Medicare, including purchasing a Medicare Part D plan, from January 1 to March 31 each year. You can only make one change each year during this period, and the new plan will begin on the first of the month after your request is received.

Reference: Yahoo News (July 27, 2020) “Medicare Enrollment Deadlines You Shouldn’t Miss”

 

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Medicare Basics: What to Know

Many clients who are retiring or suffering job loss face key decisions about their healthcare. These Medicare basics will help make those decisions.

Medicare is a commonly misunderstood government benefit.  With so many baby-boomers retiring and especially with the impact of COVID-19 on the economy, many clients are faced with important decisions on their healthcare.  For that reason, I wanted to cover some Medicare basics to help readers understand these issues.

If you’re 65 or older and lose your job, you can keep your employer-based health insurance under a federal law known as COBRA. However, it also could be more expensive. In addition, COBRA coverage isn’t qualifying insurance in place of Medicare, and if you miss some deadlines for enrolling in Medicare without having the right coverage, you could pay life-lasting penalties, explains CNBC’s recent article entitled “What to know about getting Medicare if you are 65 or older and lost your job.”

Another critical Medicare basic is that Medicare isn’t free. However, if you find yourself currently with no employer-based insurance, it may be your best option. There are also ways to lower your costs, if your income has dropped a lot.

Provided that you have at least a 10-year work history, you’ll have no premiums to pay for Medicare Part A, which covers hospital stays, skilled nursing, hospice and certain home health services. If you don’t satisfy the eligibility requirements for it being premium-free, you could pay up to $458 per month for coverage. Either way, Part A’s deductible is $1,408 per benefit period, with some caps on benefits.

Part B covers outpatient care and medical supplies. It has a standard monthly premium of $144.60 in 2020, but higher earners pay more. There is also a $198 deductible in 2020. Once you meet the deductible, you’ll typically pay 20% of covered services. You are allowed eight months to sign up for Part B, once you lose workplace coverage.

You can get a standalone plan to have with original Medicare, or you can get an Advantage Plan (Part C). These plans are offered by private insurance companies and typically include prescription drug coverage. If you select this, your Parts A and B benefits will be delivered via the insurer offering the plan (which may or may not have a premium).

A Part D drug plan covers prescriptions. The average cost for this coverage in 2020 is roughly $42 a month, but high earners pay extra for their premiums. The maximum deductible for Part D is $435 in 2020.

If you already have Part A and are enrolling in Part B because of a job loss, there is a form that you and your ex-employer should complete to avoid late-enrollment penalties, by making certain that you had qualifying coverage during the period of time you were eligible for Part B but weren’t enrolled.

Another important issue of Medicare basics is what Medicare excludes from cover.  Consider how you’ll pay for items like dental work, routine vision, or hearing care. It also excludes long term care, cosmetic procedures and overseas medical care.  Clients often mistaken the skilled nursing facility rehab component of Medicare with long term care insurance, so see here for more detail on that.  https://www.galliganmanning.com/long-term-care-whats-it-all-about/ 

Seniors frequently use original Medicare and a supplemental policy (“Medigap”) to help cover out-of-pocket costs, such as deductibles and coinsurance. Medigap policies are standardized, regardless of which insurance company sells them and your location. However, the premiums can differ from insurer to insurer and among locations. Therefore, it is critical that you know the differences you may see when evaluating your options. Look at a carrier’s premium rating system, its claims history and its customer service ratings.

If you go with an Advantage Plan, dental and vision coverage may be included. Note that these plans have their own copays, deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums.

Reference: CNBC (June 26, 2020) “What to know about getting Medicare if you are 65 or older and lost your job”

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